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WISTARBERG THREADED MUG STUDY: written by John E De Caro | HistoricalGlass.com

WISTARBERG THREADED MUG STUDY: written by John E De Caro

 

(A) THE TINDAL ISLAND WISTARBERG MUG, 4 7/8"h., half pint:

This yellow olive mug was excavated on Tindal Island, Delaware Bay, NJ, in the late 1970's by Andrew Stanzeski. The island is situated between Greenwich and the mouth of Alloway Creek. The creek ran from the Delaware Bay right up to the back of the glass works; supplies bound for Wistarberg, and goods in wait of shipment were offloaded at Tindal and held for pickup.

(B-C) THE FRANKLIN COURT WISTARBERG MUG, 3 7/8"h., one gill :

1971, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE ARCHAEOLOGISTS SCHUMACHER AND POWELL; ARCHAEOLOGY AT FRANKLIN COURT BY BARBARA LIGGETT.;

This diminutive yellow olive mug decorated with applied horizontal threading, attributed to the Wistarberg Glass Works, c.1738-1775, was excavated behind a colonial Philadelpha row home at 314 Market st, known as Franklin Court.. Benjamin Franklins home in Philadelphia was located near the center of the block bounded by third, fourth, chestnut and Market streets, now the eastern end of  the city a short distance from the Delaware river. When completed in 1788, the house centered in an open court, surrounded by a brick wall, and was fronted on Market street by five dwellings.Three of these were owned by Franklin (316, 318, and 322 Market Street), while those at 314 and 320 were the properties of Mary and Letitia Pryor and John Stille, respectively. It has proven convenient to refer to all of the "Market Street houses," while the property behind them as known as "Franklin Court" even in the patriarch's lifetime.

 

 


a         b


c         d

 

(D) UNIQUE, 2"h., MINIATURE, OR TOY, WISTARBERG MUG:

Olive amber bottle glass, straight sided body, handle differs slightly from the "arc" style, and could be considered the evolution of the "D" handle; dug at  a construction site in philadelphia, Pa., professionaly restored, presently in the collection of Malcolm L Polis.


 

(E) THE BUFFALO NY AND ERIE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY WISTARBERG MUG: 

owned by pioneer New York State collector Crawford Wettlaufer.

(F) THE DELGADO MUSEUM, NEW ORLEANS, WISTARBERG MUG:

owned by veteran glass collector Melvin Billup during the 1950's.

 

e           f

 


(G) CORNING MUSEUM : TWO WISTAR MUGS OF DIFFERENT SIZE AND COLOR,  TALLER OF THE TWO IN A RARE SHADE OF WISTAR EMERALD GREEN.

(H)  AUTHOR COLLECTOR, GEORGE MC KEARIN, OWNED WISTAR MUG, YELLOW OLIVE, CURRENTLY IN THE COLLECTION OF MALCOLM L POLIS.

 

 

g        h

 


FURTHER EVIDENCE:  THREADED MUG DISCOVERED AT WISTARBERG

For over 75 years the Wistarberg property has been owned by the Marich family. As early as the 1940's Mrs. Joseph Marich collected fragments from the fields, then putting them into wooden bins and  selling them roadside for a few cents, five cents, fifty cents, or you could buy quantity in  which she segregated fragments by color selling them in coffee and tomatoe cans for one dollar to five dollars. Norm Schleicher, of Richwood NJ, visited the Wistarberg site in the early 1970's where he bought the fragments of a broken mug found in the field by Mrs. Marichs son after plowing, In addition to this find, in  2005 I  visited the Wistarberg site and was able to meet with Mr. Marich who advised me to look in the shed ifor the treasure I sought. I believe he took pity on myself and Mr, Polis,  as we probably looked like fish out of water walking through the fields diving for the occasional above groud shard. Well all i can say is the shed was the fort knox of Wistar waste glass, rocks, and wholesome fragments, it was there we found a mug handle and a mug curl among other wonderful fragments.

(I, J, K, and L)  pretty much self explanitory, (i) I cant begin to tell you how exciting it is to have found this oversized Mug curl, proof that they made lager than the quart, probably a halh gallon. Anyway, what is interesting is the style of the terminal or curl, it is identical to every mug pictured here, but differs somewhat from the curl on the base of the handle fragment; styalistically the same but different is the execution of it. The large dug curl is what we are seeing on every known green mug and  is specific to the hand of this particular gaffer. The mug gaffers Germanic influenced handle style is not exclusive to the mugs alone; in the mid 1990's i was able to identify and purchase a large pale aqua chesnut style pitcher, once owned by Dr. James Burke and attributed by him to Wistar, from Garrison Stradling.This pitcher is the only example i know of , that has the identical matching handle and curl as the Wistar mugs pictured here. There are other "arc" handles on attributed Wistar examples that are similar in style, but not identical in every aspect of the style.

(K and L) The side of the broken mug fits perfectly over the intact example. It is interesting to note how the applied threads on the fragment have fused into the glass, this was not uncommon; there is a Wistar green threaded bowl in the Polis collection with the same fused threads, probably too much heat?

 

 

  I                 j

 

  k        L

 


  (M) THE BLUE PATTERN MOLDED WISTAR MUG WITH TOP THREADS, WITH "ARC" HANDLE: UNIQUE!

Deep blue from cobalt oxide, 16 vertical ribs, corrugated " arc" handle. Blue glass at Wistarberg was made either using copper, a sapphier blue, called "Azure" by gaffers in the period, or they used cobalt oxide. Fragmentary evidence of both have been discovered on site. This mug was tested by Jennifer Mass at the Winterhtur Museum Science Laboratory and is consistent with potash low lead level fragments found at the site in blue glass.

(N) MATCHING THE HANDLES:

The green handle fragment when compared  to the blue handle is absolutely the same!  The curl on the base of the green handle is still intact but is somewhat differnt than what we normally see ( see ( I ) for comparison.) The blue handle terminal is identical to the green handles terminal ( closely compare ( J ) . )  Lastly the strap, "Arc" shape, handles are literally the same size both with three ribs.

 

  m            n


 

 (O) THE DR. JAMES BURKE WISTAR PITCHER WITH CORRUGATED "ARC " HANDLE: Polis Coll.

 (P) THE GEORGE MC KEARIN WISTAR THREADED MUG SOLD MAY 28, 2010,  AUC 20 GLASS INTERNATIONAL FOR A. PICADIO ESQ: Polis Coll.

 

 

   o                   p

 

  q         

 


 

(R) THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM BLUE WISTAR THREADED MUG : badly cracked.

(S) THE MALCOLM L POLIS BLUE WISTAR THREADED MUG

 

r         s

 

(T,U,V, and W)  c. 1770-75 BLUE WISTAR THREADED MUG, POLIS COLL.:

comparative study of blue decorated  mug.  Using blue fragments found at the Wistarberg glass factory site 1- Identical blue terminal or curl  2- blue threaded artifact, possibly part of  a mug or creamer   3- blue hollow handle shard identical to both the Henry Ford mug, and the Polis mug.

 

 

 

t                  u

 

  v                 w