Direct Sale

OUTSTANDING WIILLINGTON DEMIJOHN

$350.00

 15 1/4" h., Rich tealy blue green, sraight sided with rounded shoulders, tapering neck, applied sloping collar, iron pontil ; attributed to the West Willington Glass Works, Willington, Ct, 1850-60, sparkling mint condition; this is not an everyday demijohn so to speak, when its got it it got it, one of the prettiest examples we have seen with almost a peacock blue- green coloration, and the condition? Notice the top of the lip as it is paddled down, looking alomsot applied appearing like a shelf, great pontil, just a special example  !

 

PRICE- 350.00

$350.00

ENGRAVED TUMBLER " I DYE 1776" ATTRIBUTED TO LAZARUS ISSACS, PHILADELPHIA GLASS WORKS, 1774-1777 POR

$0.00

Clear lead glass tumbler, 4 3/4" h., engraved "I DYE 1776" , with engraved naturalistic motif, including serrated leaves and thistles, blow pipe pontil; 

Attribution: 

Attributed to the Philadelphia Glass Works, Philadelphia, Pa., c. 1776

Condition: 

Excellent overall condition with few light scratches.

Provenance: 

Robert Saxe Collection.

$0.00
Literature: 

American Craftsman and the European Tradition 1620-1820; see pg. 234, Arlene Palmer, 93. Goblet, attributed to the Glass Works of H.W. Stiegel, inscrided W & E OLD, also 96. Covered Goblet, EMANUEL CARPENTER ESQ. Both attributed to the work of Lazarus Issacs

History: 

This extraordinary tumbler is attributed to  the hand of glass cutter and engraver Lazarus Issacs. Lazzarus Issacs is the earliest known glass cutter in America, a Jew, who left England and came to America in 1773, finding employment at Stiegel.Glass Works in Lancaster , Pa.. When the Stiegel factory closed in 1774, Issacs found employment again at the Philadelphia Glass Works,  The initials on the tumbler "I DYE" are thought to be Issac Dye. In the historical record for the period  we find several Issac Dyes in New Jersey, one from Sommeret County c. 1784, another from Salem County, same time period.

Comment: 

This tumbler is thought to have been blown and engraved in Philadelphia in the year 1776 by Lazarus Issacs. The Philadelphia Glass works was one of two glass factories open in the year 1776 and the only factory to make high style English lead glass , The Philadelphia Glass Works, a predominately English tradition glass factory, doused its fires in 1777 when the British occupied Philadelphia. There is no other period American engraved piece of glass that i know of with the date 1776. Stylistically speaking, the engraving on the I DYE tumbler reveals a strong similarity in both conception and execution to both the W&E OLD goblet, and CARPENTER covered goblet! All three examples share a similar flowering style, like the serrated leaves and thistles on the Old goblet, and all three are engraved in the English ,not German tradition. However, the letters are all identical, like large triangular serifs on the horizontal elements of the E's , and compare the D in OLD to the D in DYE, it is the same hand. In regard to the pontil used here, this is a sophisticated lead glass tumbler where you will usually encounter a glass tippet scar, like on English glass. But this tumbler, with tremendous base wear has the only blow pipe pontil scar I have ever seen on a piece of lead glass, especially one made in the high style of English Glass. So what are the chances of anything dated 1776 being legitimate? What ever the odds, it is truly a remote possibility, but there is always one in a million and this is it ; authentic dated 1776 period tumbler attributed to Lazarus Issacs, Philadelphia Glass Works.

IMPORTANT T.W. DYOTT KENSINGTON GLASSWORKS BROADSIDE, C.1820 PHILADELPHIA: "APPRENTICES WANTED"

$0.00

"A number of boys of industrious habits , ages 10 through 15, are wanted as apprentices to learn the art and science of glass blowing...",  this is the opening line for one of the rarest glass house broadsides ever found. This amazing broadside is for the Kensington Glass Factory in Philadelphia along the banks of the Delaware river which was run by both Thomas Dyott and brother Micheal  in the 1820's.

Attribution: 

Made for the Kensington Glass Factory during the 1820's.

Condition: 

The overall conditon is very good, with lightly frayed edges, some stain around the edges, and what appears to be some writting on the reverse that has bled through.

 

Provenance: 

Bob Saxe collection.

$0.00
Comment: 

The information written on the broadside tells the story of Thomas W Dyott's plan for working utopian society . This broadside tells the story of a young mans entry into the world of glass blowing, complete with spiritual guidance, a good education, the most beautiful park in Philadelphia, and no spirits on the glasshouse floor . The neighborhood nick- named "Fish Town", back then and today, was and is today, known for its mean streets. In contrast with the moral compass of Dyott, this good man had to be one determined character who set out to change the lives of working people for the better, and he did. No work in the factory on Sunday seems to be one of the many rabbits he pulled out of his hat! The names of both Thomas Dyott and Michael Dyott appear down at the bottom of the broadside. As for all inquiries, it is interesting to note that Michael could be reached on the factory floor at the Kensington Factory, while Thomas could be visited at the store at 2cond and race street. After much research and our consulting with experts in the field, we are confident as to the opinion of those experts dealing with all manors of Ephemera, that this broadside is now the first example of its kind to come to light: considered important and possibly unique!. POR

IMPORTANT WISTARBERG DECORATED CREAMER

$75,000.00
Wistarberg decorated creeamer

Deep blue bottle glass with lead content from added cullet, pear shaped body, decorated with delicate horizontal threading around the upper neck and mouth, applied horizontal medial thread around waist, the lower body is gadrooned, what is sometimes refered to as "proto- Lily Pad", or "finger-gadrooning", applied solid round handle, applied conical foot, pontil scarred base.

 

Attribution: 

 Attributed to the Wistarberg Glass Factory, Alloway, New Jersey, c. 1738-75, probably made sometine between 1769-1775.                                                                                                                                                              s

Condition: 

 Sparkling Mint condtion!

Provenance: 

David & Linda Arman; Charles Moore Americana; Robert Saxe collection

$75,000.00
Literature: 

There is a blown glass cream bucket presently in The New Orleans Museum of Art  that exhibits the same decorative treatment as seen on the blue Wistar creamer. Originally from the collection of Melvin Bullip, the bucket appears in the special exhibition catalog of the Museum of American Glass at Wheaton village, titled "The Wistars and Their Glass 1739-1777, made of a clear tinted aqua metal, Fig. 25, Pg., 24, called a colorless sweetmeat or cream bucket.  

 

History: 

The creamer was tested at the Winterthur Museum Science Laboratory by Senior Scientist Jennifer Mass, using Spectrograph Analysis .Blue shards of similar  color excavated at Wistarberg were scientifically compared to the creamer. Other known Wistar objects were also used as a foundation for comparative analysis. The conclusion is Wistar positve, no easy accomplishment. Upon request,a copy of the report will be given to the buyer at the time of sale. In regard to the treatment used in decorating the creamer, this unusual style of gadrooning was first done in Great Britain and could possibly be traced to  the early 19th century, possibly the New England Glass Works.

Comment: 

The decoration is identical on both the blue creamer and Bullip clear bucket , its the same hand! The single medial thread is also present on both examples, a rare feature, as is the conical foot style. The variation in shape between he gadrooned leaf -like petals on each object are once again the same. There is yet another cream bucket in the Corning Museum, in blue, without decoration, that was handed down through the Wistar family, it once belonged to Caspar Wistar's granddaughter Sarah. The buckets are the only two Colonial American examples known.
This creamer is one of the more important discoveries made in 18th c American glass. It is the only other piece of Wistar glass known, beside the cream bucket, that features this rare and early style of gadrooning; extremely rare and important!!

SOLD / ZANESVILLE OHIO 24 RIB SWIRLED PITCHER

$5,000.00
Lot Number: 
3

6 3/4"h., Aquamarine, sodalime glass, bucket shaped body, pattern molded with 24 rib swirled to the right, wide short neck with pinched pour spout, applied wide corrugated strap handle, pontil scar; Zanesville, Ohio, c.1826, although there is a tiny sliver off the curl this does not affect the pitcher showcaseing  as mint condtition .When you consider how rare and desireable this pitcher is, and  focus on the cost and availability of one in mint condition, it becomes clear that  this pitcher is a golden oppourtunity and a steal, to put it in plain english!

$5,000.00

ZANESVILLE FREE BLOWN PAN

$775.00
Lot Number: 
Zanesville colored pan

 5"w., x 2"h., Yellow, soda lime bottle glass, circular body with conical flaring sides, folded rim, pontil scar; Zanesville, Ohio, c. 1826-30, mint condition; outstanding color, great character to the glass, the real deal, you will not be disapointed!

Estimated Value- 800-1200

PRICE- $775.00

$775.00

IMPORTANT C. 1790 AMELUNG BOTTLE, GOVERNOR OF GEORGIA, JARED IRWIN P.O.R

$0.00

 

Attribution: 

NEW BREMEN GLASS WORKS, FREDERICK, MARYLAND, C.1785-95 ; tested, Winterthur Science laboratory, Dr. Jennifer Mass, quantitative spectrograph analysis

Condition: 

 

 Excellent overall condition with no issues;  the paint was also tested at Winterthur Science Laboratory  and confirmed to  be  from the 1890’s )  

 

Provenance: 

Harmer Rooke Gallery. New York, N.Y., sold at absentee auction.

$0.00
History: 

Jared Irwin-

Jared Irwin, Statesman and twice Governor of Georgia, moved from Mecklenburg Country, N.C to Burke County, Ga. as a child. Commissioned a Brigadier General during the Revolutionary War, he distinguished himself following the War as an Indian fighter.
In 1788 General Irwin served as a representative to the Georgia State Constitutional Convention. In 1789 and 1798, he attended conventions which revised the State Constitution, serving as President of the 1788 convention. He was Governor of Georgia , c.1796- 1798 and 1806-1809. Among his first official actions was the signing of the act which rescinded the Yazoo Law.
General Irwin served several times as President of the State Senate and was a State Senator at the times of his death March 1, 1818, Irwin county.Irwinton, and Irwinville, were named for the Governor. Jared Irwin is buried close to his home, not far from Irwinton.   

 

Comment: 

Beautiful blue green bottle glass, made for “Porter” and referred to as a “Porter Bottle.” The style , color, and glass composition, are very similar to what was made at the New Geneva Glass works. Interestingly enough Balthazar Kramer, one of the original Stiegel Glass Blowers, left Manheim Pa., with Foltz and Eberheart and established the Frederick Glass Works in Frederick Maryland, c. 1780. Most people are unaware that John Frederick Amelung bought the Frederick Glass factory, called the "Foltz Glass works", in 1785, and hired the previous owners, Kramer & Eberheart ( Foltz had died) to blown glass and manage the New Bremen Glass Factory. This is the earliest known American Porter bottle in a color other than black glass, and is the first porter to be identified as an Amelung product!